The Three Billy Goats Gruff Story (With Audio and PDF Versions)

The Three Billy Goats Gruff

Click on the download link below to get the PDF version of our take on the Three Billy Goats Gruff story.

Additional resources will follow the story, like teaching ideas, a vocab list, and YouTube resources.

We hope you enjoy our story.

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Once upon a time, on a grassy hill lived three billy goats. 
All three of them were named Gruff. 
There was Small Gruff, Medium Gruff, and Big Gruff.

a river with a bridge over it

One day, the Billy Goats Gruff saw a big hill that had lots and lots of grass.
To get there, though, they needed to cross a small bridge.

The mean troll

But, under the bridge lived a troll.
The troll was big, smelly, and very mean.
The troll was also very hungry.

Hoofs on a bridge going "trip, trap, trip, trap."

Because the bridge was small, the Billy Goats Gruff crossed one at a time.
The first goat to go was Small Gruff.
His hoofs went trip, trap, trip, trap on the bridge.

"Who is tripping on my bridge?" asked the troll

The troll heard the noise above him and jumped up onto the bridge.
“Who is tripping on my bridge?” yelled the troll.
“It’s just me, Small Gruff.”

"I am too small to eat," says Small Gruff.

 “I will gobble you up!” yelled the troll.
“Please no, Mr. Troll, I am too small to eat,” said Small Gruff.
“Too small?” asked the troll.
“Yes, wait for my brother. He is much bigger than me,” said Small Gruff.

Small Gruff eating grass on the other side of the bridge

The troll thought and thought and thought.
Finally, he said, “Okay, you may go, but I will eat your brother!”
Small Gruff nodded and quickly ran across the bridge to safety.

Hoofs on a bridge going "trip, trap, trip, trap."

The second billy goat to cross was Medium Gruff.
His hoofs went trip, trap, trip, trap on the bridge.

"Who is tripping on my bridge?" asks the troll.

The troll heard the noise above him and jumped up onto the bridge.
“Who is tripping on my bridge?” yelled the troll.
“It’s just me, Medium Gruff.”

"I am too small to eat," says Medium Gruff.

 “I will gobble you up!” yelled the troll.
“Please no, Mr. Troll, I am too small to eat,” said Medium Gruff.
“Too small?” asked the troll.
“Yes, wait for my brother. He is much bigger than me,” said Medium Gruff.

Small Gruff and Medium Gruff eating grass on the other side of the bridge.

The troll thought and thought and thought.
Finally, he said, “Okay, you may go, but I will eat your brother!”
Medium Gruff nodded and quickly ran across the bridge to safety.

Hoofs on a bridge going "trip, trap, trip, trap."

The third and final goat to cross was Big Gruff.
His hoofs went trip, trap, trip, trap on the bridge.

"Who is tripping on my bridge?" asks the troll.

The troll heard the noise above him and jumped up onto the bridge.
“Who is tripping on my bridge?” yelled the troll.
“It’s me, Big Gruff.”

"No you will not!" says Big Gruff.

 “I will gobble you up!” yelled the troll.
“No, you will not!” said Big Gruff.
Lowering his head, Big Gruff showed the troll his big horns.

The troll is thrown into the river.

Quickly, Big Gruff charged and smashed into the troll.
The troll flew off the bridge and fell into the river.
Then, Big Billy Goat Gruff walked across the bridge.

The End

On the other side, the three brothers began to enjoy the grass.
Soon, they all became fat and happy.
All three billy goats lived happily ever after.


About this Story

The story of the Three Billy Goats Gruff comes from Norway. It was written in the mid-1800s and has since become a well-known children’s story in English.

Our version of the story has been simplified to make it easier for children who are learning English. If you want to see a more traditional take on this story, here is a great version from americanliteraure.com

If you want to read more fairy tales and stories for children and English-learners, then you can check out our collection. All of our stories have been made using simple English that is more commonly used today. They also have pictures and additional resources to help you get the most out of our stories.

The Learner’s Nook Fairy Tale Resources

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Vocabulary List

These words are the ones we believe are important for your child to know, not just to understand the story, but to improve their English level.

Once upon a timeA traditional opening to a fairy tale
Billy GoatsMale goats
SmallLittle, not large
MediumAverage, not big or small
BigLarge, huge
To Crossto go from one side to the other
BridgeA structure that allows you to go over water or a gap
TrollA mythical creature, usually mean
Trip, Trapthe sound of hooves on the bridge
Hoof/HoofsThe feet of a goat or horse
GobbleTo eat
To WaitTo stay in place for an event to occur
MuchA lot
SafetyA state of being safe, out of danger
HornsSharp protrusions on some animals’ heads
To EnjoyTo like
ThoughtPast tense of to think
HeardPast tense of to hear
Smashedto hit hard (past tense)
RiverA moving body of water

Teaching Ideas

These are just a couple of ideas you could use to get a little more out of this story. Stories can usually be a great backbone for a larger grammar or vocabulary lesson or series of lessons. Here are some ideas that we hope you can use.

Sizes

Teach children about vocabulary like small, medium, and big. You can also work on comparisons like bigger and smaller.

Ordinal Numbers

First, second, third, etc. Lots of children have trouble learning their ordinal numbers. The Three Billy Goats Gruff story can help you with reinforcing this vocabulary. We also have a post on ordinal numbers if you need more help with this.

The Past Tense

Everyone who is learning English probably needs to review their past tense conjugations. Stories like this can help you reinforce past tense verbs without resorting to boring flashcards or tedious worksheets.

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YouTube Resources

More Questions?

We do our best to have all the resources that we think that you’ll need. If you have any questions or need anything else, please feel free to comment on this post so that we can help you out.

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